Study: Divorce is on the Rise

Posted by Steven D. Eversole | Apr 05, 2014 | 0 Comments

Most sources put the divorce rate at around 50%, adjusting for age and other demographics.A new study published by the Minnesota Population Center and featured in Time Magazine, shows that the divorce rate may be higher than initially expected, especially among older couples. Every couple may hit rocky points, but nearly half of married couples reach the point where they are ready to call it quits. This could be even more likely in second marriages and for older couples. New statistics show that while divorce rates may be lower among young couples, this doesn't mean that families are more stable. Cohabiting couples who are unmarried are even less likely to survive.

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The American Community Survey started digging deeper into divorce rates in 2008 to uncover more specific data. While figures since the 80s haveĀ  maintained that the divorce rate hovers around 50%, new data indicates that the rates may be even higher, and continuing to rise. Our Birmingham divorce attorneys are dedicated to helping clients navigate the legal system and protect their rights during separation and the dissolution of marriage. In addition to providing strategic counsel and advocacy, we are also abreast of sociological trends that impact the rates of divorce.

According to reports, divorce rates are especially high among older couples. The Baby Boom generation was responsible for deviating from traditional values, resulting in a high degree of individualism, and a general rise in marital instability. These couples who are now middle-aged and reaching retirement are not becoming more grounded or stable in their marriage. Studies show that divorce rates have skyrocketed for those between the ages of 60 and 65 since 1990. Reports from the Minnesota Population Center also show that these rates go up even higher for couples above the age of 65.
One reason that older couples have a higher rate of divorce is because they are more likely to be in their second or third marriage. Once a first marriage fails, it is more likely to divorce in a second or third. The baby boomer generation was divorcing at staggeringly high rates in the 70s and 80s and it seems that they have continued this trend into their later years. As marriage has become less of a duty and institution, more couples are feeling free about moving forward independently.

Though older couples divorce at a higher rate than younger ones, younger generations are also divorcing at record levels. Young couples are more likely to go through multiple partners and to divorce than previous generations. Whatever age you consider divorce, it is important to consult with an experienced advocate who can protect your rights and interests.

Every couple faces their own reasons for divorce, and some are more complicated than others. You may have grown apart or fallen out of love. Some couples divorce because of financial struggles, infidelities, or abuse issues. Regardless of your reasons to divorce, the final decision to separate from a spouse is your own. Trends towards divorce may not be a signal of failure, but a sign that more couples are willing to face reality and transition into a new phase in life.

Contact Birmingham divorce and family law attorney Steven Eversole at (866) 831-5292.

About the Author

Steven D. Eversole

J.D., Samford University's Cumberland School of Law, Birmingham, Alabama B.A., University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Alabama

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